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Dr. Saliha Afridi Dr. Saliha Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Saliha Afridi is a clinical psychologist. She is also the founder and Managing Director of The L... more

Dr. Saliha Afridi is a clinical psychologist. She is also the founder and Managing Director of The LightHouse Arabia, a community wellness center in Dubai. Dr. Afridi earned her Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and her Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Clinical Psychology from the Arizona School of Professional Psychology in Phoenix. Her clinical training has been as a generalist working with children, adolescents, and adults on a range of diagnoses. Her expertise is in parenting, as well as burnout within the workplace sector. less

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Questions & Answers
Teenage daughter
Anonymous posted in Parenting
Answer

1. Limit distractions: remove any distractions to make listening easier (i.e. phones; iPADS; televi... more

1. Limit distractions: remove any distractions to make listening easier (i.e. phones; iPADS; television) – and remember if you ask them to put their phones away, it’s important that you model the same behavior. 2. Be curious: stand in a position of curiosity rather than judgment or knowing. Don’t assume you know why your teenager is feeling angry, worried, sad, etc. Rather ask what it is that makes them feel (insert feeling) or engage in certain behavior. 3. Display open body language: lean in and get down to your teenager’s level (e.g. if they are sitting on the floor, then get down onto the floor yourself). 4. Model active listening: by repeating 2 to 3 words that your teenager has just used in a the sentence, they will feel heard. 5. Spend one-on-one time with your teen: and learn to embrace their world (e.g. If they love playing Minecraft, then ask them to teach you how to play too. Or if they are interested in arts and crafts, sign yourselves up for an art class that you can attend together). 6. Respect their privacy: and practice healthy boundaries whilst still being an authority figure. Resources to help parents: - “The five love languages of teenagers” – Gary Chapman - “How to Talk so Teens will listen and listen so teens will talk” – Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish. less

Dr. Saliha Afridi Clinical Psychologist
4 months ago
Eating Habits
Anonymous posted in Parenting
Answer

1. Sensory preferences Sensory processing plays a vital role in determining the type of food childr... more

1. Sensory preferences Sensory processing plays a vital role in determining the type of food children choose to eat. Children can be more sensitive to certain tastes, textures, smells, and even the sight of food. Some children may present as over-sensitive to certain sensory stimuli in their mouth (AKA oral defensiveness) which may be observed by gagging behaviors or strong refusals to try intensely flavored foods. Other children are sensitive to smells hence why they request more bland foods. A child who displays sensory-seeking behaviors may refuse soft or bland foods and request more stimulating foods such a chewy, crunchy, or highly flavored foods. Some children have sensory-based motor difficulties who struggle with the coordination skills required to manipulate a knife and fork resulting in avoidance of foods that require increased effort. 2. Lack of choice Children are often served up the dinner option leaving little room for individual choice and preference. Although it is not always possible to provide à la carte options, research suggests that children eat better when they assist with shopping, preparing, cooking, or serving their meal. It is important to include children in choosing foods occasionally for them to feel that they have a say over what they are fed. 3. Same old, same old When parents serve similar food over and over again, children may get stuck in ‘food ruts’, and are left with a feeling of avoidance towards a particular food. To help your child eat better, experiment with your menu now and then, add more varieties. Remember that it can be the same items but prepared in different styles. 4. Medical Concerns It is possible that there is a real, physical or medical concern affecting your child’s ability to eat. This may include food allergies, acid reflux or even severe constipation. To rule this out, it's important to consult with your child’s doctor and proceed accordingly. less

Dr. Saliha Afridi Clinical Psychologist
5 months ago
How can I force my son to study?
Anonymous posted in Parenting
Answer

Nothing good comes out of force. As parents, we may want our children to do well in all spheres of ... more

Nothing good comes out of force. As parents, we may want our children to do well in all spheres of life. however, if we find ourselves feeling as though we need to ‘force’ them to engage in studies it may potentially lead to further avoidance, or in some cases, an aversion to learning and studying. Here are three tips that can help foster a more positive relationship with learning for your child: - Develop the right atmosphere: Learning styles vary from child to child. Some may prefer a quiet space with little to no distractions while others may perform better with some level of mild auditory or visual stimulation in the background. Use your best judgment and along with a discussion with your child, choose a learning style and space that works best for your child and in which your child feels the most at ease. - Study Time, Same time, every time: Children thrive when they have a consistent routine. Anything that is followed and done in a systematic manner always yields a positive outcome and the same goes for studies. Make a schedule and adhere to it. Predictability can alleviate stress and anxiety and consistency means that a healthy habit can be more readily developed. - Recognise and celebrate achievements: It is very important that you acknowledge and appreciate your child’s achievements, however small they may seem. This not only boosts their self-esteem, it reinforces the behavior you want to see more of (e.g, better engagement with homework), maintains motivation and helps to develop a positive attitude towards learning more generally. less

Dr. Saliha Afridi Clinical Psychologist
5 months ago
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