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The Lighthouse Center The Lighthouse mental health and wellness clinic Dubai

The LightHouse is a community mental health and wellness clinic providing quality psychological and ... more

The LightHouse is a community mental health and wellness clinic providing quality psychological and psychiatric care to children, adults, couples and families. Located in central Dubai, The LightHouse brings together an international team of licensed psychologists and psychiatrists offering a range of treatments. The LightHouse is also home to the Raymee Grief Centre, which provides free grief support services to anyone living in the UAE. Our modern, friendly clinic is an ideal setting where you’ll feel safe and confident to explore your mental health and emotional issues. Licensed by the Dubai Health Authority, The LightHouse was founded in 2011 by clinical psychologists Dr. Saliha Afridi and Dr. Tara Wyne, whose shared mission and vision is to make the region happier and healthier. less

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Questions & Answers
How to know if it’s ADHD or it’s just a child who gets bored easy?
Anonymous posted in Parenting
Answer

Parents often self-diagnose their children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and... more

Parents often self-diagnose their children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and while sometimes they may be on the right track, often these behaviors fall within normal variation or developmental differences. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, children everywhere have been affected by physical distancing and social deprivation. Children have been catapulted into new routines and deprived of familiar social outlets, this ‘new normal’ is not easy and can often lead to a ‘bored’ child. Today, many parents face challenges in managing their child’s activity levels, attention, and emotional regulation and are seeking structure and support, while also keeping up with school and family expectations. Sometimes we must remind ourselves that kids are kids, they are energetic beings, and when deprived of movement breaks and asked to sit for long periods, it can often lead to inattentiveness, hyperactivity, or boredom.   When a child is diagnosed with ADHD, primarily inattentive or primarily hyperactive/impulsive or combined, the diagnosing clinician must complete a detailed assessment and follow specific criteria based on the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM–5). Boredom is not a symptom of ADHD, however, it is commonly reported by parents of children with ADHD that they often seek increased stimulation when compared to their peers and struggle to find outlets to keep themselves from being bored. Children with ADHD often report that their level of arousal fades faster when compared to their peers, especially when they are engaged in a task that they do not find particularly interesting or lengthy.  As a parent, if your child is displaying prolonged hyperactivity and finds it difficult to focus and pay attention, they may be displaying some signs of ADHD. However, if your child can control their impulses, emotions, and attention levels in some environments, it may be more related to sensory preferences. If you are considered about your child’s behavior, talk to the school and a mental health specialist who can provide insight into your child’s behaviors and discuss the assessment process. Parenting a child with ADHD can be challenging, however, there are lots of supports available to overcome daily barriers and manage symptoms. Early diagnosis and intervention is essential in decreasing the risks of anxiety, depression, and other mental health difficulties that may arise in later childhood. Therapeutic intervention supports children with ADHD to better access the school curriculum, navigate the social world and reach their full potential. less

The Lighthouse Center mental health and wellness clinic
5 months ago
How to let the child follow rules?
Anonymous posted in Parenting
Answer

1. Consistency is key: F... more

1. Consistency is key: Firstly, it's important to note that many children will push boundaries & test the limits in their environment. That’s just their human nature. However, despite this truth, it's imperative that parents strive for consistency when it comes to disciplining their kids. Children need boundaries, the more boundaries there are in the home, the more safe & secure your child will feel.
2. Values-based parenting: instead of focusing on the rules, rather anchor the boundaries in your family's values. For example: Instead of saying to your child "You're grounded...because I said so!" rather say the following: "You're grounded because you wouldn't share your toy with your cousin and in our home, we value "generosity". By not sharing, you went against one of our core values. This way, the child understands why they are being grounded & they simultaneously learn about the value of generosity too. 
3. Create a Value Wheel: Brainstorm what your top 10 values are & create a colorful wheel with the different values in each spoke (e.g. generosity, kindness, respect, honesty, gratitude, health, courage, flexibility, integrity & trust).  Allow your kids to be a part of this creation so that they are well informed what your values are in the home, rather than trying to enforce "rules" in the home. Every time your child oversteps a boundary or misbehaves, you can point to the value wheel & explain why they will be grounded.
4. Walk your talk: Put these values into action by modeling them to your kids. Point it out when your kids carry out a values-driven action too (e.g. "I am proud of you for having the 'courage to try out a new extra-mural activity at school").
5. Call a time-in: instead of sending your kid to time-out or "the naughty corner", rather send them to the "thinking corner" or to their rooms to go take some time-in & reflect on their behavior (e.g. "Go think about what caused you to pull your brother's hair, how you felt before you did that & what you could have done differently. When you are done thinking about it, let's problem-solve together too."). This way you start building your child's self-awareness muscle, which is one of the pillars of Emotional Intelligence.
- Christine Kritzas (Counselling Psychologist & Education Director at The LightHouse Arabia)
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The Lighthouse Center mental health and wellness clinic
6 months ago
What causes poor emotional regulations?
Anonymous posted in Parenting
Answer

You have to think about it from the point that your child’s age and developmental stage. how much e... more

You have to think about it from the point that your child’s age and developmental stage. how much exposure do they have and what is the lifestyle like at home, what are they looking up, want to buy them, and how you are responding to him. Poor regulation skills mean that they just have not got those skills yet a lot of it comes down to how many opportunities you give your child to build them up. we do not learn any skill in the book unless we repeat that skill in order to enhance it. less

The Lighthouse Center mental health and wellness clinic
6 months ago
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